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Lahmacun ~ Boat Shaped Turkish Flat Bread Pizza (without an oven)

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Lahmakun ~ Turkish Flat Bread Pizza

Lahmacun ~ Turkish Flat Bread Pizza

There is a new (old now, its been 4 months) Deli in our neck of the woods that we obsessed about for a while. Eclectic interiors and great food. We had a Turkish style flat bread pizza that I was quite impressed with. Crisp at the bottom, thin crust and with options for versatile fillings, this was one dish that I knew I would try making at home.

I’m a big fan of flat breads for their versatility. Give me rotis, I’ll make it into a Tortilla wrap :) or a Kathi Roll or a Quesadilla or at-least an Anda Roti Flat breads have so much more potential than just languishing about as a roti IMO.

The day I decided to make the Lahmaksun, apparently that’s what it is called, I was running late to serve dinner and instead of making a yeasted dough, I used baking powder to give the dough some fluffiness. It all came together quite easily and I baked it on a hot tava, although the original does better in a really hot pizza oven.

There are four elements (although I am pretty sure they are far from authentic) to this Turkish pizza that made it an easy weeknight dinner

  1. Dough made with baking powder instead of yeast
  2. Frozen pasta sauce I had on hand
  3. Caramelised onions which really elevate the flavours
  4. Use of any spicy dry sabzi to top it

I topped a couple with a dry chicken mince, and another couple with a dry aloo sabzi that I had. Both turned out fabulous. Since these have a fancy braided border, they make for great party food either as appetizers or as a main course.

Lahmacun ~ Turkish Flat Bread Pizza

Lahmacun ~ Turkish Flat Bread Pizza

Turkish Flatbread Pizza with Chicken Mince and Caramelised Onion (Makes 4)

To make the flatbread

1 ½ Cups Wholewheat flour

½ teaspoon Salt

½ teaspoon Baking powder

½ teaspoon oil

Water to knead the dough.

Add the salt and baking powder to the flour and mix, add the water and make a soft dough just like for chapati. Apply the oil and set it aside for 30 minutes.

Make 4 equal parts of the dough and roll it on a lightly floured surface like a roti into a 7 inch diameter circle. It should be about 1/4 of an inch thick, similar to a paratha. 

Using your index fingers, twist the edges of the dough circle to form a rope pattern, you can also use the tines of a fork to make the border. Seal the bottom and top by twisting. Prick all over with a fork and repeat with the rest of the dough.

Heat a tava to medium hot and cook the flatbreads on medium heat, turning a couple of times till brown spots appear all over and the bread is cooked. Place between soft cloth to keep warm while you make the topping.

For the topping

¼ cup pasta sauce (can use store bought)

¼ cup caramelised onions

Fresh Coriander sprigs

1 cup spicy chicken mince (recipe follows) or a dry sabzi such as potato, green onion, cauliflower etc. Avoid using a south Indian style poriyal.

Heat the flatbread on a griddle to warm them. Place 1 tablespoon of pasta sauce onto the bread and spread. Top with the chicken mince, top with the caramelised onions and serve with some fresh coriander.

Spicy Chicken Mince

250 grams Chicken mince

1 medium onion finely sliced

1-2 green chillies chopped finely

¼ cup fresh coriander leaves

½ teaspoon ginger and garlic paste

¼ teaspoon cumin powder

2 tablespoons oil

salt and pepper to taste

Method

Heat oil in a pan, wash the mince and set aside.

Add the onions and green chillies to the hot oil and saute till they are just turning golden brown. Add the ginger garlic and saute for a minute.

Add the Chicken mince and saute till the colour changes to opaque.

Add the salt, pepper, cumin and coriander leaves, mix well, cover and cook on a low flame for 10-12 minutes or till the mince is turning a light shade of brown. Turn off and cool.

Eating out~ Molecular Gastronomic Drama! Tuscany at Trident Hyderabad

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Thanks to TV shows, the world of Molecular Gastronomy has been watched, savoured and drooled upon. Some unbelievable creations are made, served to the diner at the table with an unbeatable dose of pure drama. What meets the eye is seldom what hits your palette in the world of Molecular Gastronomy. I was excited to be invited to experience this spectacle at Tuscany, the Italian specialty restaurant at Trident Hyderabad.

The restaurant is always tastefully done with dim lights and the tinkling view of the busy Hitech City area traffic lights. We begin the evening with the customary freshly baked foccacia and a superbly made white wine Sangria. The citrus notes enhanced by the slices of fruits was just what the evening called for.

Chef Rahul Gomes Pereira and his team along with the Executive Chef Manik Magotra spent months prepping to bring this food festival to Hyderabad. In Chef Manik’s words “To give to the city something that’s never been done before”. The Kitchen turned into a lab and experimentation began in all earnest to prep for the 10 day festival which has been on from the 15th of August until the 25th of August.

Molecular Gastronomy is a very modern style of cooking that marries the advances of science and technology with the actual preparation of food. What this means for you and me is that we are presented with stunningly plated dishes, which sometimes are very deceptive in their looks because they seldom taste what they look like. Flavours are highly saturated which makes you take notice of the core ingredients much more than what we would normally notice and the use of visually pleasing elements such as foam, smoke and liquids turning into little tiny caviar like balls or flash frozen greens or the dust of an ingredient presents itself on a plate.

Deconstructed Caprese

Deconstructed Caprese

The first course is an appetiser – Deconstructed Caprese. Caprese is one of my favourite ways to eat mozzarella. I even have a recipe for it on my blog. The plate arrives with small spoons laden with what looks like red coloured noodles topped with cheese. The noodles are actually flash frozen noodles made from tomatoes, the mozarella takes on a whole new texture because of the way it is presented and I am fascinated with the caviar like tiny balls of balsamic! It is a burst of flavours and the textures are so subtle that they belie their looks! I am smitten and wait for the next course.

Mushroom Cappuccino

Mushroom Cappuccino

I had a savoury cappuccino for the soup course. Presented like a regular cappuccino is, in a cup and saucer with a wafer as an accompaniment that turns out to be parmesan biscotti. The cloud of mushroom foam topped with the of porcini mushroom gives way to an intensely flavoured creamy soup. The texture contrasts between the crunchy biscotti, foam and the creamy soup is a good play off. I had more than what I intended to consume which will tell you how partial I am to mushroomy flavours. This one is not for those who do not relish the fungus.

For the main course, I sample both the Quinoa and pearl Barley and Buffalo Wings.

Quinoa and Pearl Barley with Truffle oil and Rucola Orange Salad

Quinoa and Pearl Barley with Truffle oil and Rucola Orange Salad

The Quinoa and pearl barley with truffle oil crumble is a very interesting dish that draws again on textures and flavours. There are sundried tomatoes and black olives studded into the quinoa and pearl barley, the textures complement each other. The Rucola (which I found very tough) and Orange salad that accompanies adds a nice fruity note with the balsamic and wine reduction, tempered with pomegranate molasses.

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Buffalo Wings with Blue cheese foam and Red hot caviar

The Buffalo wings with blue cheese foam and red hot caviar is a true showpiece of Molecular Gastronomy. Chicken marinated and beaten to derive the texture wanted then slow cooked using a technique called Sous-vide which is vacuum packed food that is cooked in a temperature controlled water bath for a few hours to retain its moisture, texture intensify its flavours. The blocks of chicken are topped with a soft foam of blue cheese and topped with red hot caviar which is actually pearls made out of a spicy sauce. I loved the flavours of every element of this dish although blue cheese isn’t for those who dislike strong flavours.

Chef Pereira is delighted with the response the food festival is getting and thinks that all the hours of prep is worth the delight on the faces of his diners who going by the full restaurant are lapping up this gastronomical spectacle. Chef Manik tells me that each item on the Ala Carte menu is painstakingly constructed from scratch. The nature of preparation is such that nothing can be made much ahead, stored or preserved. Ingredients and elements disintegrate if kept, some infact are constructed just seconds before it gets plated and some things have to be done at the table itself. This means that all hands are on deck in their kitchen and the training is super intense. Sustaining an elaborate menu as a regular offering therefore is not currently possible.

The meal is almost coming to an end and we are presented with Earth ~ Dusky planet. It is a plate with a spherical chocolate shell, a hot truffle sauce is poured on it, melting the outside and revealing the core which contains a duo of mousse – one a wild berry and the other is vanilla. There is a compote of wild berries as well and chocolate sand on the plate as a contrast to the texture of the silky smooth mousse and ofcourse the drippings of the hot chocolate truffle sauce! I am not a very chocolate person, but the combination of the berry flavours with chocolate is classic and I dig into even the last bits.

Pineapple and Pepper corn crepes flambed with dark rum and served with a Licorice ice cream

Pineapple and Pepper corn crepes flambed with dark rum and served with a Licorice ice cream

Just as I think the drama won’t get better, we have another dessert plate sent to our table. This time it is Fire ~ A small block of pineapple and peppercorn crepes (Carribbean inspiration here), served with a liquorice ice cream which I am excited to try. Not happy enough with the myriad flavours on this plate, the chef decides to set it on fire and flambes the whole thing! The dark rum caramelises the flavour of the crepes, and the peppercorns hit the tip of the tongue so intensely that the crepes can be had even without the ice cream and would taste complete. The licorice icecream! Oh man it just took my breathe away ~ the flavour of the licorice is just perfect, enough to entice, but not strong enough to overwhelm. I drained every last drop of this. For me this was the piece de resistance and I ended my meal on a very high note. I do not think any other dessert will replicate this experience for me for a long time.

This was a whole new experience in food for me. It would be safe to say that this city has not experienced anything like this before and is truly something that takes you by surprise. The winner for me in this whole experience was the play of flavours. Each essence captured and intensified, the drama is just a huge bonus.

Recomended Dishes:  Fire ~ Flambed pineapple and peppercorn crepes with licorice icecream

Deconstructed Caprese

Buffalo wings with blue cheese foam and red hot caviar

Dates of the Festival: 15th August to 25th August 2015

Price: A meal for two (A la carte) would be approximately Rs. 3500 + Taxes.

Hours: 7.30 pm to midnight.

Location: Tuscany, Trident Hyderabad, Hitech City, Hyderabad

Credit Card Accepted: Yes

Valet Parking: Available

Telephone: 91 40 6623 2323

PS: The meal was complimentary as I was invited by the hotel to the restaurant, however the views are my own.

{Eating Out ~ New Menu Review} Le Cafe, Novotel, Hitech City

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Le Cafe

Le Cafe

Cafes and I go back a long way. I’ve spent time at them waiting, courting, reflecting, absorbing and grieving. Every verb attached to an emotion that can exist has been experienced over the last two decades at coffee shops by me. I love them with company and they are ideal places to get lost with your thoughts, books or for that matter in today’s times, a screen. There are the ones run by chains, which look and feel familiar across most cities and then the stand alone ones with a charm of their own.

Novotel at Hitech City in Hyderabad has a lovely, sunny (air conditioned) side walk style cafe in the hotel premises and I was invited to sample their new menu offerings last week.

The timing was perfect, tea time and I walked in and was seated at the seemingly small but surprisingly uncongested cafe. It is built like the many sidewalk cafes across Europe and particularly France and is situated on the left of the main entrance. Tho Le Cafe occupies the corridor between the hotel and the convention centre. It has plenty of seating with tables and chairs nicely spaced. Open from 6:30 AM till midnight, Le Cafe has a wide choice of bakes, pastries, short eats like sandwiches and a good selection of beverages.

Previously the cafe had an ever changing menu. Which included promotionals for special occasions such as Valentine’s Day and seasonal offerings to incorporate seasonal produce such as Mangoes during season. Now the menu operates in three ways, displayed as a small standee on each table, comprising of made to order sandwiches, wraps and beverages, a black board display of the bakes and desserts available adorning the walls of the cafe and baked offerings in the display units, with prices mentioned, which change daily.

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The selection is very extensive for a Cafe and includes Sandwiches and Wraps, Salads, Baked Goodies, Made to order Cakes, Cookies and Macarons, Made to order menu all-day breakfast, Icecreams, Beverages etc.

Macarons ~ in many flavours

Macarons ~ in many flavours

We begin with a bunch of macarons. Delicate meringue sandwiched with pastry cream in an assortment of flavours. Cardamom and coconut – reminiscent of old world biscuits to be dunked in tea, a little strong on flavours. Saffron – delicate and subtle. Blueberry – my favourite of the lot, just the right balance of fruit, cream and crunch.

Chocolate Fudge Cookie

Chocolate Fudge Cookie

Next up from the variety of cookies that include oat and raisin and granola cookies, I tried the Chocolate Fudge Cookie – its decadent, dense and very deeply chocolatey in a nice way.

Le Cafe entices you with a range of baked goodies like several variants of croissants and doughnuts, glazed with chocolate or dusted with cinnamon sugar, made in house and fresh each day. The rows upon rows of pastries make one feel like a child in a candy shop. Colours, flavours and the promise of indulgence.

Chicken Sausage Strudel and Mushroom & Cheese Quiche

Chicken Sausage Strudel and Mushroom & Cheese Quiche

The Mushroom and Cheese Quiche – stellar – crisp tart shell, creamy and delicious filling, lovely flavours of the mushroom and melted cheese coming through. This is a must try. The second savoury bake I try pales in comparison. A Chicken sausage strudel made of puff pastry, the layers of puff pastry are perfect but the filling does not live up to its promise. They are priced at Rs. 120 for a serving.

Chicken Tikka Sandwich

Chicken Tikka Sandwich

They have a range of made to order breakfasts which are served all day and there is a wide range of wraps and sandwiches that can be had with a choice of bread – Panini, whole grain, multigrain or sandwich. I tasted the Chicken tikka sandwich. It is a large portion priced at Rs. 300 and comes with a side of potato wafers. Succulent pieces of chicken tikka, lots of mayonnaise and some other sauces, I think there was cheese also and it was grilled to perfection. The fillings are interesting and one can choose from cheese and mustard, achari paneer and tomato bocconcini amongst the others. The chef at the counter will put together your order on the spot. Le Cafe also has a range of fresh salads one can order.

Decadent Pastries and Desserts

Decadent Pastries and Desserts

The indulgent pastry and dessert menu is hopeless to resist. A very dense and yet delightfully satisfying flourless chocolate pastry (apt for those who are on a gluten free diet).

Tiramisu

Tiramisu

There is the famed Tiramisu – Indulgent mascarpone layered with coffee drenched savoiradi cookies, best indulged in small portions because of its richness.

Decadent Desserts and Pastries

Decadent Desserts and Pastries

The white chocolate and raspberry slice – a mousse that comes in a block and the pistachio pop cake with blueberry dome – pistachio sponge filled with blueberry mousse though are very goodlooking desserts, they do not live up to their looks. I was disappointed particularly by the flavour and dryness of the pistachio dessert.

The deeply satisfying Opera Cake

The deeply satisfying Opera Cake

The stand out pastry for me was the Opera Cake, slivered layers of Almond jaconde (sponge) soaked with coffee syrup and layered with chocolate ganache and coffee buttercream. The knock out melded flavours and textures are worth every calorie they hold.

Its a great option to catch up with a friend, for a casual date or just to spend time alone with a cup of coffee and a nibble appropriate for the time of day. Their range of beverages ranges from many kinds of coffees, teas and smoothies and shakes. The cafe also has free WiFi which is useful if one is hanging out alone.

The prices for the baked goodies range from Rs. 60- 150 which is very reasonable considering they are housed in a five star hotel. Wraps and sandwiches are about Rs. 300 each, desserts and pastries are from Rs. 150-200 and beverages are Rs. 170 onwards.

They also have a range of ice creams and you can order for fresh custom made cakes which are upwards of 500 grams. They also sell a range of breads like Ciabatta, Baguettes and Rye bread by the loaf.

I enjoyed the range of options Le Cafe offers and have marked it as a place to catch up with friends over coffee the next time I need to meet someone. The ambience is calm and peaceful, for the price they charge is much more sophisticated than a noisy coffee bistro.

 Le Cafe

Recomended Dishes: Chicken tikka sandwich, Opera Cake, Mushroom and Cheese Quiche

Timings: 6:30 AM till Midnight

Price: The prices begin at Rs. 60 and go upto Rs. 300

Location: Novotel Hotel, HICC Complex, Hitex road, Kothaguda, Hyderabad

Credit Card Accepted: Yes

Valet Parking: Available

Telephone: 040 66824422

PS: The meal was complimentary as I was invited by the hotel to the restaurant, however the views are my own.

Wonton Wrapper Samosa

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Wonton Wrapper Samosa

Wonton Wrapper Samosa

I’ve had wonton wrappers sitting in my freezer since err….I can’t really remember. Actually I buy a lot of stuff at the grocery store which I don’t really needand when I am in the act of buying it, I have visions that include dreamy, beautiful and totally stunning plating of the end product. What happens in reality is that they languish in the deep recesses of my fridge, freezer or pantry cupboard and after a few months, depending on their state, they get used in something totally ordinary or they get trashed.

A packet of wonton wrappers was one such item I picked up imagining great parties being thrown around wontons and spring rolls. But like a blot on my conscience, every time I opened the freezer, the pack of wrappers would guilt trip me! This weekend, I made samosas with them. I usually do not deep fry at home, I am terrified of filling a kadai with oil and God knows I don’t need to eat anything deep fried. But I felt those wrappers had patiently waited to come out of the freezer for so long that they did deserve their own kadai of hot oil.

I was doing an Iftar food coloumn for Hans India, the paper I write for and wanted to include a recipe for samosas which are one of the most popular Iftar foods (in Hyderabad). These wonton wrappers make samosa making a breeze, if you have a dry leftover sabzi or even some chicken or mutton keema, it can be shredded and used as a stuffing. The wrappers make for a terrifically crunchy outer covering which is my favourite part. In fact the outer covering is very much like the Hyderabadi Chota Samosa. For those of us who have eaten and relished onion filled Chota samosa, being able to replicate the taste and texture of them in a home kitchen is a big score!

Wonton Wrapper Samosa

Wonton Wrapper Samosa

Wonton Wrapper Samosa (Makes 20)

20 wonton wrappers (easily available in the frozen food section of a supermarket)

1 cup filling of choice –

(I used a dry Aloo filling for half and a chicken mince filling for the other half. The recipe for chicken mince filling is mentioned below)

oil to deep fry

1 tablespoon flour mixed with 2 tablespoons of water to make a ‘glue’

Method

Spread the wonton wrapper on a flat surface covered with a kitchen towel.

Fold one corner of it over the rest of the wrapper to form a triangle, fold over again to form a pocket. Here’s a helpful video on samosa folding.

Spoon in 1 tablespoon of filling into the pocket, cover the loose flap and seal with the glue, set aside. Repeat with all the wrappers.

Heat the oil in a kadai drop the samosa into the oil carefully, fry till golden, turning over to cook all sides. Use a spoon to remove the golden samosas, place onto tissue paper to drain and serve when still hot.

Chicken Mince for Samosa Filling

250 grams Chicken mince

1 medium onion finely sliced

1-2 green chillies chopped finely

¼ cup fresh coriander leaves

½ teaspoon ginger and garlic paste

¼ teaspoon cumin powder

2 tablespoons oil

salt and pepper to taste

 

Method

 

Heat oil in a pan, wash the mince and set aside.

Add the onions and green chillies to the hot oil and saute till they are just turning golden brown. Add the ginger garlic and saute for a minute.

Add the Chicken mince and saute till the colour changes to opaque.

Add the salt, pepper, cumin and coriander leaves, mix well, cover and cook on a low flame for 10-12 minutes or till the mince is turning a light shade of brown. Turn off and cool.

 

Eggless Pistachio Cake with Thandai Buttercream

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Pistachio Cake with Thandai Buttercream

Pistachio Cake with Thandai Buttercream

I’ve been going over my food pictures over and over again for the last hour. I’ve missed writing here. A lot has been happening and I wrote about it here. Dismal little has been said here. I miss writing here, sometimes the words fail me, sometimes I’m too tired, I have about 25 draft posts and yet nothing to publish. I haven’t been cooking much, definitely nothing fancy and blog worthy. Sometimes I just want to post something, but even that I haven’t been able to…

I’ll start with this cake. I made it last Diwali. Yes that’s a long time ago, but wait, I have pictures that date back to about 5 years ago that will probably never get posted here, or anywhere else. So its ok I think to be posting stuff from not older than a year ago.

So about this cake, it started with wanting to make something with an Indian mithai flavour. One of my favourite Indian sweets is the Pista roll, very similar to kaju katli, but the flavour of pistachios and the colour just gets me as excited as a child each time. I made this cake eggless since I took some of it to share with K’s parents who don’t eat eggs. I used a little buttercream to pretty it up and cut the cake into squares. You can also bake this batter as cupcakes in a paper lined muffin tray.

 

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Eggless Pistachio Cake

2/3 cup                  Milk at room temp

3 Tablespoons       Yoghurt/ curd

1 teaspoon             Pistachio essence

1 1/2 cups              Maida

1/4 cup                  Ground Pistachios

3/4 cup                  Sugar

1/2 teaspoon          Salt

1 1/2 teaspoon       Baking powder

a pinch                   Baking soda

7 tablespoons         Vegetable Oil

1/2 teaspoon          green food colour (optional – I used this)

Preheat oven to 350F / 180 C. Line an 8 inch square cake pan with paper and grease.

Powder the sugar till fine. Add the maida, ground pistachios, salt, baking powder and baking soda to a mixing bowl and whisk with a fork or a spoon to mix together.

Whisk together the milk, yoghurt, pista essence, colour if using and oil. Add the wet mixture to the dry mixture and with a wooden spoon or a hand held whisk, mix till well blended.

The batter should fall in thick ribbons. Pour the batter into the cake pan and tap it to remove air bubbles.

Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until a tester comes out clean. Remove from pan and cool completely on a wire cooling rack before slicing into 16 equal squares.

To make the buttercream

1/2 cup    Butter at room temperature

1 1/2 cup   Confectioner’s Sugar / Icing Sugar

2 tablespoons Thandai syrup (substitute with 2 tablespoons milk mixed with crushed cardamom pods, rose petals and a few drops of rose essence)

A few drops of pista essence and green food colour

With a hand beater, beat the butter until it is creamy. Add the sugar, 1/2 cup at a time and whisk till fluffy. Add the thandai syrup, essence and colour and beat. Taste and adjust for sweetness or flavour. Place a star tip nozzle in a piping bag or in a ziplock bag and add the buttercream to it. Press out swirls or rosettes onto each square piece of the cake. Serve with some tea or coffee or with a scoop of icecream as dessert.

{Eating Out ~ The Anglo Indian Food Soiree at Kanak, Trident, Hyderabad

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Anglo Indian food has been a closely guarded cuisine, accessible only to those with close connections with families of Anglo Indian origin. Having grown up with a smattering of Anglo Indians in the family and subsequently having close friendships with them, I am privy to their life – their food, fashion and quirks. If one thing is clear, it is their love for the good life and that includes good food. Anglo Indians love their mince, several of their dishes use minced meat of chicken or mutton and beef liberally ranging from cutlets to their version of kofta curries called ball curry. However this is a cuisine that is slowly dying and in need of more attention and credit. A lot of the populace has migrated overseas and the ones that remain, have integrated with other communities via marriage, such that it is rare to find a true blue Anglo Indian.

The cuisine is no doubt a legacy of the British Raj, who trained Indian Cook staff at their establishments such as the Railway service, Mail service, Clubs and corporate establishments. Soon trained butlers were confident enough to marry very western preparations such as cutlets, roasts and steaks with locally available produce and very Indian spices of red chillies, pepper, cumin and cloves. As the empire spanned the length and breadth of the country, influences of Bengal, Kerala and the coasts is unmistakable in the use of mustard oil, potatoes, coconut milk and tamarind amongst others.

I was invited by Trident Hyderabad to sample the food at their ongoing Anglo Indian Food Soiree, at Kanak their speciality Indian Restaurant.

Chicken Pantras

Chicken Pantras

We started with  the Chicken Pantras ~ pancakes stuffed with minced chicken, parsley and with a hint of spice from the cinnamon and cloves. Subtle and yet flavoursome, this is a must try dish.

Fruit and Vegetable Grilled Salad

Fruit and Vegetable Grilled Salad

Next up was the Grilled fruits and  Vegetables Salad ~ fruit such as pears and green apple, skewered alternatively with sweet potato, tomatoes and pickled gherkins. This the chef told us, the inclusion of grilled fruit and vegetables was a very british inclusion. I liked the taste and texture of the pear and apple, but didn’t like the extreme acid of the pickled gherkins.

Vegetarians will love the Rawalpindi Potato Scones ~ patties made of indulgent ingredients such as potatoes and cheese, subtly flavoured with herbs and Kashmiri chilli. These scones are melt in the mouth and very filling. A must try for potato and cheese lovers.

Travancore Fried Fish

Travancore Fried Fish

Travancore Fried Fish took me by surprise. The menu takes into account all of the places that have Anglo Indian population and Chef Manik Magotra has included dishes from all over the country, some which rightfully deserve more attention. I will be honest that Kingfish is’nt a favourite of mine. Usually it ends up tasting very woody either because it is not prepared well or stored (frozen) properly. The minimal spices in the Travancore Fried Fish made sure the fish stands out and yet is succulent. With a squeeze of lime, this was one was a winner.

Railway Mutton Curry

Railway Mutton Curry

We moved onto the main course and I was most excited to try the famous Railway Mutton Curry. Legend has it that this curry was made palatable to the mild British palette by reducing the fiery hotness of the spices with the addition of coconut milk or / and yogurt. The Mutton curry was first served on the East Indian railway lines and hence has a strong Bengali influence. Soft pieces of lightly fried potato perfectly mingled with succulent pieces of mutton in a well spiced but nuanced gravy made with dried red chillies and whole spices. This is one curry that has gained popularity and is well recognised.

Dak Bunglow Murgi Roast

Dak Bunglow Murgi Roast

The dish of the evening tho, was the Dak Bunglow Murgi Roast. Stories about the history of these dishes abound. Mostly legends make up where authenticity fails. The British empire apart from establishing the network of rails, which gave birth to many a recipes that were served to passengers enroute, the mail system which employed a relay of men for delivery gave rise to the Dak Bunglow – dak meaning post and Bunglow meaning house. These relay carriers would have to rest enroute and hence they stayed at these houses, staffed by the Indians, usually in really small places with very little access to ingredients etc. The cooks employed at these places used their ingenuity to come up with recipes that married the methods and dishes of the British with locally available and Indian ingredients and spices. This dish is a perfect example of this method. Chicken is marinated with very Indian spices and slow roasted to perfection, roasting was a very western method of cooking. It is served with a thick gravy spiced liberally with whole pepper corns and accompanies either rice, vegetables or bread. The chicken was succulent, the gravy robust and it was easily my favourite dish of the meal.

The other famous dishes such as Country Captain Chicken Curry and a Shrimp and Egg Curry is also on offer.

Vegetable and Paneer Jhalfrezi

Vegetable and Paneer Jhalfrezi

Subz aur Paneer Jalfarezi ~ assorted vegetables and paneer tossed in spices and thick tomato sauce is a vegetarian main course option. I was pleasantly informed by the Chef that Jalfarezi was a very fusion recipe, I’d always assumed it was a punjabi dish.  A word that according to wikipedia combines the Bengali colloquial word ‘Jhal’ meaning spicy food and parhezī means suitable for a diet. This meant that leftover meat was stir fried with onions and spices and made suitable for eating, in a time when eating leftovers was not an allowed Hindu practice.

Bamboo and Bhindi Quoorma

Bamboo and Bhindi Quoorma

The unique combination of Bamboo and Bhindi Quoorma ~ Okra and Bamboo shoot in a light Quorma gravy was the discovery of the day. Whole okra, soft and simmered with the crunchy bamboo shoot was very unique and I loved both the flavour and texture of the dish. Having only eaten Bamboo shoots in oriental cuisine, this was a delightful surprise.

Doll Churchuree

Doll Churchuree

The Anglo Indians love their “doll curries” lentils simmered again in very little spices, Doll is dal in a new avatar. The Doll Churchuree, with the medley of atleast 4 lentils I could make out (bengal gram, moong, tur and black gram) and simmered with apples, raisins and Indian spices was silky smooth and gained from the individual textures so unique to each lentil. The apples and raisins adding a delicate tart and sweetness to the dish. Pale in colour, this dal dish is very rich in flavour and taste and is  a must have with Indian flat breads like naan or lachcha paratha.

To mop up all the gravies, we were served a subtly fragrant saffron rice.

Shahi Tukra

Shahi Tukra

To end the delightfully nostalgic meal, we had a rich Shahi Tukhra, deep fried pieces of bread, soaked in sugar syrup and flavoured with saffron, topped with indulgent rabri. This was a little on the sweeter side, as is typical of all Indian sweets.

It is rare that food of this kind finds its way to a food festival. The effort, research and intention is admirable and very visible. The Anglo Indian food festival is available on A La Carte and set menus based on the selections made by the guest on request are also available.

Recomended Dishes: Chicken Pantras, Bamboo Bhindi Quoorma, Dak Bunglow Murgu Roast, Doll Churchuree

Dates of the Festival: 16th June to 28th June 2015

Price: A meal for two (A la carte) would be approximately Rs. 3500 + Taxes.

Hours: 7.30 pm to midnight.

Location: Kanak, Trident Hyderabad, Hitech City, Hyderabad

Credit Card Accepted: Yes

Valet Parking: Available

Telephone: 91 40 6623 2323

PS: The meal was complimentary as I was invited by the hotel to the restaurant, however the views are my own.

{Eating out ~ New Menu} at Firdaus, Taj Krishna

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The Indian fine dining restaurant Firdaus at Taj Krishna in Hyderabad has always served up dishes to best showcase Deccan and North West Frontier cuisine that it represents. Guests have always come back with an experience to remember, with great food and terrific luxurious service. I was invited a couple of weeks ago to sample the new menu. Chef Nitin Mathur and his team have spent a lot of time and passion researching dishes that would be worthy of representation. Several signature and star dishes from the original menu remain, while new ones to regale guests have been added.

We started with Murgh Jahangiri Shorba which is a creamy chicken broth, flavoured with tomatoes and Indian spices. Served with a small bite of a tava paratha on the side, it was a god start to the meal. I am not very fond of soups and consider them appetite killers contrary to them being touted as appetizers. But this soup with its deep flavours was quite nice. The vegetarian offering was a Bhuni Mirch Makai ka Shorba and quite honestly this was the better of the soups. The flavours of the roasted Mirch and Makai (corn) added so much depth of flavour to the soup.

Sangri Lal Mirch Ka Kabab

Sangri Lal Mirch Ka Kabab

My favourite part of the meal is the appetizer course. I almost always enjoy starters and dessert much more than the main course. From the vegetarian selection, we had the Sangri lal mirch ka kebab. Sangri is a sort of bean or a pod that grows in the desserts and is dried for future use. In this dish, the rehydrated sangri is combined with special fiery mathania chillies from Rajasthan and made into kebabs and pan fried. The Sangri takes on a meaty texture and is very robust, lending this kebab good body.

Makai Motiya Seekh

Makai Motiya Seekh

The next item was the Makai Motiya Seekh. Seekh kebabs made out of corn. These kebabs were well spiced and the texture was creamy unlike the dry vegetable seekhs one usually has. The Jaituni Malai Paneer was a disappointment. Chunks of paneer, coated in a marinade that was almost akin to a tapanede, the olives were lost on me and what remained was just oven cooked paneer chunks. I gave this one a miss for seconds.

Kakori Kebab

Kakori Kebab

Non vegetarians always have prized pickings at the appetizers especially with Deccan and North Western cuisine, both well known for their meat heavy kebabs. Kebabs were meant to be made with meat anyway, so the variety that is available is always good. We were served three different starters from their selection. The Kakori Kebab always has me drooling. Meat pounded and almost creamy, mixed spices, rose petals and the nutmeg shining through. This was to be my favourite non vegetarian starter. The Pathar ka gosht, looked good, but did not deliver. The spice rub and the meat seemed to be miffed with each other, while the meat was cooked to a succulent, lending itself completely to the stone it is cooked on, the spices had a mind of their own. I was disappointed, which I told Chef Nitin Kumar about and he promised to check on it. The Kebab-e-Firdaus was a chicken starter amidst the other mutton preparations. Succulent thigh pieces marinated in yogurt and spices and cooked to perfection in the tandoor. This was my second most favourite starter after the kakori kabab.

The other guests at the table included very senior journalists and I always enjoy conversations with them about food and the ever bewildering traffic situation. When the main course arrived, I was more than ready. Firdaus has a live roti trolley, equipped with a gas burner with a chef who rolls it over to a table and doles out freshly made rotis of choice, smeared of course with ghee. Chef Nitin Kumar told us that this is one of the most endearing aspects of the restaurant and guests often exclaim that getting hot puffed up rotis at the table is a luxury reserved only for trips back to the home town, as busy lives make most of us accustomed to eating cold food.

Chef Nitin Mathur

Chef Nitin Mathur

The vegetarian dishes that comprised the main course included Laal Mirchi ka paneer, the gravy drew its intense flavours from the red chillies, Chowgra which is a well known Hyderabadi dish of mixed vegetables and the absolutely outstanding Aloo Wadi Bharta. I am not a big fan of potatoes, but the flavour and character of this dish was entirely from the home made wadis, mashed into it. How can they be homemade despite coming out of a five star restaurant kitchen you may ask. That is because the recipe is from the home of Chef Nitin Mathur’s wife. The recipe was extracted from her grandfather and after consultations with a few other members of the family, the wadis were made. This attention to detail and the dedication to get the ingredients, recipe and the preparation right is something that reflects in the menu at Firdaus.

The non vegetarian main course consisted of Murgh Tarmezi Korma which in my opinion is one of the best kormas I have eaten. Usually kormas are flavoured with fried onions, and that is a flavour which dominates. This one was a korma with flavours so subtle, I was afraid to taint it with roti and actually spooned it into my mouth as is. The white gravy in total contrast to the usual brown and orange ones we are so used to, is delicate and creamy with the ground cashew paste. The Korma was to be my favourite main course dish of the day.

Next we sampled the Kaddu ka Dalcha. Now let me tell you, if one has grown up around a Hyderabadi house one has had many encounters with this Hyderabadi staple. I for one, am very critical of all the dalchas I encounter, only because my mother makes a really fabulous one and two because I’ve been surrounded by families who make terrific ones. Being spoilt for choice, it is rather rare to settle for anything less. I am happy to report that the Kaddu Dalcha was outstanding. It tasted of home, which I suppose is a compliment to a Five star hotel kitchen – just the right tang from the tamarind extract, pieces of bottle gourd and creamy lentils.  Again Chef Nitin Mathur informed us, that a detailed discussion on the preparation methods, the use of lentils etc. led the team to choose this variant over the others. I have always had dalcha that uses a combination of chana and tur dal and I find that the flavour is much deeper and the chana also acts as a thickening agent. This was the same combination and I ate the dalcha as is. Usually mutton is added to the non vegetarian version which again adds to the flavour, but this one was terrific even at the cost of repeating myself.

I gave a cursory taste nod to the Subz Biryani and the Kache Gosht ki Biryani. Both good, and have been firm favourites on their menu, and why not, we are in Hyderabad afterall! The biryanis were accompanied by Mirchi ka salan and raita.

Melt in the mouth Dahi Wada

Melt in the mouth Dahi Wada

There was also ‘melt in the mouth’ Dahi Wada garnished with chutney.

The menu offers many more well recognised dishes such as Paya Shorba (broth of roasted lamb trotters), Dum ka paneer (Paneer cubes cooked in a gravy that’s rich with cream and flavoured with brown onions). There is also the classic Shikampuri (Lamb kebabs with yogurt, mint and finely chopped onions stuffed into the centre) and of course the much loved Gongura Mamsam (lamb cooked with tangy sorrel leaves)

Dessert Platter

Dessert Platter

The Dessert platter that was served had some classics – Double ka Meetha which is one of my favourite Hyderabadi desserts. Again the twist here was that it was firmer than it usually is and much less sweet and the distinctive flavour of saffron that was used in the soaking syrup. Sometimes Indian sweets can be overwhelmingly sweet and it was good that this one wasn’t because it was a delight. We also had some Badam ka Kund, which was very similar in taste and texture to the Moongdal halwa (which I don’t much care for). But the best was the Kulfi – Handmade Kulfi, rich and creamy with all the goodness of malai (cream), decadent and the hint of Chikki (peanut and sugar brittle) elevating it completely. Topped with good old Rabdi and Sabja (basil) seeds which give it a very Falooda on a plate feel. There was also freshly cut fruit.

For me, this delightful meal felt special because of the attention to detail with the selection and construction of recipes. Each one carefully chosen, well researched and ingredients sourced carefully. This is a reflection of the passion of the Chef. He spoke to us about each recipe in great detail and there was no question that went unanswered.

Firdaus at Taj Krishna, Banjara Hills

Recommendations:

Appetizers:Sangri lal mirch ka kebab, Kakori Kebab

Main course: Aloo Wadi Bharta, Murgh Tarmezi Korma, Kaddu ka Dalcha

Desserts: Double ka Meetha

Hours: Lunch: 12:30 PM To 03:30 PM
Dinner: 07:30 PM To 11:30 PM

Location: Taj Krishna, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad

Credit Card Accepted: Yes

Valet Parking: Available

Telephone: 040-66293306  (Reservations are recommended)

PS: The meal was complimentary as I was invited by the hotel to the restaurant, however the views are my own.

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